Rehab Addict: Franklin-Style

It's like a freaking field day for Caitlyn at the salvage warehouse.

It’s like a freaking field day for Caitlyn at the salvage warehouse.

Caitlyn’s got the DIY bug. Between rehabbing The Frankfort House and her recent “Rehab Addict” bingeing, my wife’s at no shortage of projects or ideas for gussying up the Grand Old Dame.

One of Caitlyn’s many jobs is actually delivering catered lunches all over central Indiana, and it just happens that last week she drove through Franklin, Ind., a small town about 30 minutes south of where we live. While there, she drove by a shop called “Salvage Sisters,” and instantly she channeled her inner-Nicole Curtis and wondered what day we might make a trip down there to see what treasures we could unearth.

Turns out that day was just 72 hours later, so off to Franklin we went. We didn’t even make it to Salvage Sisters before she saw yard signs along Forsythe Street for Franklin Heritage Inc. Architectural Salvage (FHAS), a hidden warehouse chock full of salvaged items, only open from 10 am to 2 pm Saturdays. A few turns and a little jaunt north of downtown, FHAS is like rehab heroin: Doors of every variety and size, 1920s bathroom sinks, 1930s baseboards — you name it. At first a bit overwhelming due to the sheer inventory, everything is well organized by category, offering shoppers a sort of “organized chaos.”

Our sink of the future (minus the faucets, which will be replaced with more historically accurate ones).

Our sink of the future (minus the faucets, which will be replaced with more historically accurate ones).

Some of the products have prices, while others don’t. Haggling is permitted for the cash-strapped, but they also take credit. Not sure how to quite install something? The shop is run by Franklin Heritage, Inc., who places proceeds toward local preservation projects, so the workers are quite knowledgeable.

In the end, we only walked away with two pieces of baseboard to replace those pieces that were stripped off by a previous owner in the mud room of The Frankfort House, but it was $8 well spent. We also looked at a 1920s cast iron bathroom sink that we will be going back to snag this weekend for $40, with plans to scrub it down and replace the historically inaccurate faucet knobs.

I worry going to Franklin might replace our Saturday morning yoga if their inventory remains this good!

Stay tuned for more posts on our trip to Franklin.

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